Blog

Welcome to DSM-5-TR

dsm-5-trWithout much fanfare, the American Psychiatric Association has launched an updated DSM. It's DSM-5-TR, which includes a hefty handful of changes, detailed here by Jonathan Singer (you may know him from the Social Work Podcast). Per Singer, text revisions include:

  • updated descriptions of the prevalence, risk, and prognostic factors for each disorder based on new findings from research.
  • one new disorder in the chapter Trauma and Related Stressors called prolonged grief disorder (F43.8). This is the only disorder that should be referred to as a DSM-5-TR disorder, because it is new to the text revision. All other disorders should be referred to as DSM-5 disorders.
  • a change in terminology from intellectual disability (previously mental retardation) to intellectual developmental disorder [(F70) mild; (F71) moderate; (F72) severe; (F73) profound].
  • a new category for Other Conditions That May Be a Focus of Clinical Attention - Suicidal behavior and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI).
  • codes for the initial encounter of someone with suicidal ideation or attempt (T14.91A), subsequent encounters (T14.91D), and a history (but not current) suicidal behavior (Z91.51).
  • codes for current NSSI (R45.88) and a history (not current) of NSSI (Z91.52).

Will this be on the exam? Eventually, yes. But look at the bullet pointed list. There's not much meaty material for exam question writers, except maybe for the new addition, prolonged grief disorder. We'll come up with a sample question or two on that in future posts.

The ASWB doesn't do trick questions, so a social work exam item aiming to catch you dozing on the difference between intellectual disability and intellectual development disorder is unlikely, but then again you never know. Give the article a read, and rest assured that we'll be integrating the new material into SWTP practice questions. We've got you covered.

So, back to it. Happy studying and good luck on the exam!

Categories :
comments powered by Disqus

Search Our Blog