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ASWB Exam Practice - Respect Toward Colleagues

A client at an inpatient facility asks to be transferred from a young social worker to a veteran social worker. What should the veteran social worker do? What does the NASW Code of Ethics say?

Walk-through the choices and learn how to get to the correct answer with a combination of social work wisdom, common sense, and a process of elimination in this video.

Get practice, get licensed!


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ASWB Practice Question Walk-Through: Dating Colleages

Here's a question buried in the SWTP blog that we've revived for this video walk-through (a growing series).

Working together at a residential facility, a therapist and case manager develop a strong attraction to each other. Both are social workers and want to be mindful of ethical guidelines as they begin to explore a relationship outside of work. Which of the following BEST describes NASW guidelines for relationships between social work colleagues?

Do you have an answer before seeing the offered answers? Great. But the answer you conjure may not always appear in the answers offered. Hit play. Subscribe to SWTP on Facebook or YouTube to get these as they post.

Happy studying and good luck with the exam!

--Will Baum, LCSW

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ASWB Exam Prep Video: Client Records and Confidentiality

Is it okay to talk to a client's previous therapist? What if the client doesn't want you to? Here's a walk-through of a question from the blog addressing that very scenario.

What this takes: remembering the confidentiality section of the NASW Code of Ethics. Unsure? Don't worry, the video has you covered. Question, Code of Ethics portion, answer, and explanation are all included.

Remember, the real exam doesn't tell you the answer--you have to give it. Get practice answering lots of questions in one sit with SWTP's full-length practice exams. 170 questions each, just like the real thing. Sign up to get started. 

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ASWB Exam Question Walk-Through: Colleague Burnout

What to do when a colleague says she hates her clients? This practice question, pulled from an earlier post, gets you to the answer. (Spoiler: knowing the NASW Code of Ethics is a big help!) Here's the Facebook no-longer-live video.


The sound is muddy. (Seems it came through the camera, not the headphones.) Living and learning. Enjoy!
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Free Practice: The Red Carpet and the Social Work Exam

red carpet Seems like a good day for a free practice question. Here's one based upon the updated NASW Code of Ethics. For lots more questions about social work ethics and most everything else you might encounter on the ASWB exam, sign up and choose full-length exams here.

A somewhat grandiose client, a successful businessman, boasts that he has started dating an actress, "the most beautiful woman in the world." He reports with pride that the relationship has "been in all the tabloids." The social worker, not a regular reader of celebrity gossip, wants to find out whether or not the client is telling the truth. Which is true about conducting an internet search on the topic in this situation?

A) It would be ethical since it would assist the social worker in correctly diagnosing and treating the client.

B) It would be unethical unless the social worker first obtains consent from the client to conduct the search.

C) It would be ethical only if the client has exhibited additional delusional symptoms.

D) It would be ethical since gathering collateral information is an important part of the treatment process.

What do you think?

Let's get to the correct answer by narrowing down, starting from the bottom. D) is a little general to be the correct answer. Collateral information can be an important part of treatment, but that's not enough to justify a possibly-unethical electronic search. Probably not the answer. Let's move on.

C) is closer. However, if the client is making up his story, it's probably connected with narcissistic personality disorder, not with delusional disorder or another similar diagnosis. Boasting and surrounding oneself with well-regarded people is a hallmark of NPD. Keep on going.

B) sounds clunky--how would the social worker ask the client for consent? "Can I Google that to find out if you're lying?" Hmmm...

A) jumps into an area not addressed by the vignette. Is the client undiagnosed? We don't know that from the text of the question. Yes, it's valuable to have an accurate diagnosis. But there are ethical considerations that must first be weighed. Once you see any mention of ethics, it's a good bet that the question is Code of Ethics-based. That's not what's addressed here.

Which brings us back to our least objectionable, most textbooky answer: B. Get consent, maybe without being clunky. (Try something along these lines: "I'd like to see that. Is it okay with you if I take a look on the net?"_Bookish answers are often the best ones.  Even if you didn't remember that there are guidelines about internet searches in the Code of Ethics, you could get to the answer with this type of elimination process.

To save you some clicking, here's that part of the code, added in 2017:

1.03 Informed Consent--(i) Social workers should obtain client consent before conducting an electronic search on the client. Exceptions may arise when the search is for purposes of protecting the client or other people from serious, foreseeable, and imminent harm, or for other compelling professional reasons.

Now you're ready to face a question like this on the exam. There's nothing like practice to get you prepped for the big test. Happily, we've got lots of practice questions ready to help you out. Enjoy your studying and good luck on the exam!

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